i-Blog

The Brain Type Institute has made Brain Type® assessments on thousands of people–many well-known. Most of these “famous” persons were not evaluated in person but rather by video tape analysis using Brain Typing’s methodologies. These evaluations are based on BTI’s years of typological, scientific, and empirical studies. Though we believe the appraisals are correct, we do not want them held as absolute—lest people profiled be unfairly judged by those who do not fully understand Brain Types. BTI intends only for the positive application of this information and desires readers to grasp its essence—that each person possesses an inborn design, one of 16 individual Brain Types, which predisposes him or her to specific cognitive, physical, and spatial traits.

5/6 – Fears, phobias, Bubba Watson, and Mark Zuckerberg

We’ve all experienced fearful situations; it’s at the core of being human, but most importantly, it is necessary for one’s survival. Yes, fear is not only beneficial, it is essential to make it from one year to the next. But many wonder, “Wow far do I let fear impact or rule over me?” Good question; it all depends on the circumstance(s).

The deep limbic system of the brain, especially the brain’s right amygdale, not only processes good and bad emotion, but fear. Overstimulate this region and life becomes traumatic; under-activate it and dangerous risk-taking is much more apt to occur. Additionally, if overactive amygdala are engaged, along with a hot and active anterior cingulate (the brain’s gear shifter), one can become obsessively and irrationally fearful. Some might label that phobic.

Fears and phobias can run through all the 16 Brain Types to one degree or another. There are many contributing factors, and far too many to list them one by one here. Still, among the 16 inborn designs, we have witnessed more consistent phobic tendencies among a few of them, most notably the #13 FCIR. As dominant Conceptuals, their imaginations can run wild, and as CI owls, they can literally over-think so many aspects of everyday life. This is even true among female #13s, who hesitate to pull the trigger as a result of keeping their options open (and not wanting to make the wrong decision). Remember, the #13 nickname is the “Strategizer,” and boy do they strategize.

Golfer Bubba Watson has admitted to many fears. “I have a lot of mental issues … I’m just so fearful of things, which I shouldn’t be. Scared of heights … buildings falling on me … the dark. Scared of crowds. In between holes is really scary to me, because there’s so many people that close to you. I’m just scared of people … in general.”

Bubba’s caddie shared that he notices everything, pointing out people in the crowd who act at all strangely. “He’ll be looking at me and say look over your right shoulder. There’s a guy with a red shirt and a blue cap and he’s got his phone underneath that thing.”

Another well-known #13 FCIR who is fearful is Mark Zuckerberg, who spent more than $6.5 million last year on bodyguards and other measures to protect himself and his growing family. Granted, he has reason to be afraid, as ISIS itself threatened his life. His security is considerably higher, however, above other well-knowns. “His expenditure on personal protection massively dwarfs that of Apple CEO Tim Cook with the iconic company spending just $275,000 on security for its leader.” Zuckerberg is reportedly so concerned about his own security that he has no less than 16 people protecting him at his Californian home. Facebook has footed the bill for Zuckerberg’s personal travel on private jets to ensure his safety, and have also installed alarms, cameras and other equipment at his homes.

Humorously, one of the most phobic celebrities of all time is said to be #13 Woody Allen. He’s afraid of insects, sunshine, dogs, deer, bright colors, children, heights, small rooms, crowds, cancer and anywhere except Manhattan.

Written by: Staff
(click for source)

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5/3 – Goodbye to baseball’s Joe Garagiola

Although it happened back in March, we wanted to pay our respects to Joe Garagiola (#1 FEAR), a Major League Baseball legend who went from playing on the field to broadcasting in the booth. Joe died at the age of 90, and he was certainly the “Entertainer” in all respects, known for his “sharp sense of humor” and “a seemingly endless trove of stories.”  Audiences simply loved him, as “his personality transcended games” and even landed him a guest host on Johnny Carson’s “The Tonight Show.”

Although he never made it to the Hall of Fame, Garagiola was a talented player who spent nine seasons in the majors as a catcher, and batted .257 in his career. Afterwards he broadcasted alongside Harry Caray (#13 FCIR), and again later with Curt Gowdy and Vin Scully (#11 FCAL) on NBC. He once said, “Baseball, it hasn’t changed that much. You still have to hit the ball and you still have to catch it. Good players will win and bad players will lose. Winners win and losers make excuses. It’s as simple as that.”

Below is a good interview from years back with Garagiola and David Letterman (#13 FCIR). His lively nature is definitely fun to watch!

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Written by: Staff
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4/27 – Jon Lester has Steve Sax Syndrome

He appears to be a reincarnation of Steve Sax (#6 BEIR). Not only does pitcher Jon Lester (#6) share the same inborn Brain Type, but he also can’t throw the baseball to first base.

It has been famously dubbed “Steve Sax Syndrome,” and the disease first emerged back in 1983 when Steve Sax “inexplicably became incapable of making routine throws to first base, committing 30 errors that season.” Fans sitting behind the first base dugout began wearing batting helmets as mock protection By 1989, however, Sax was cured, and the syndrome never returned again.

Jon Lester of the Chicago Cubs, however, has not been cured, and has been experiencing the same symptoms for years now. As one author writes, “The lefty can make pinpoint pitches but ask him to hold a runner at first, and it becomes an adventure.” It has gotten so bad for Lester, in fact, that on Sunday he was forced to play it safe by purposely throwing the ball directly into the ground, as a stunned crowd watched it bounce toward first base and get Brandon Barnes out. You have to see the video, which is posted below. Major League Baseball humorously Tweeted, “Half off for ground shipping.”

Yes, both Sax and Lester have struggled with controlling specific cerebral neurons, especially related to their BT. Few circumstances would tax their brains as have these 2 similar sports scenarios. Without breaking down all the angles, just note that the highly emotional and deeply pondering Q2 brain area can create some trying circumstances including impairing motor movement (especially fine motors). The key for Lester (and Sax in the past), and all athletes in sports, is to essentially stay in the brain’s anterior (front) region seeing and rhythmically reacting, not excessively ruminating or fearing consequences.

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Written by: Staff
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4/26 – The reclusive man, formerly known as Prince

He was talented. He was eccentric. He was philosophical. The music artist known as Prince was found dead last week in his home elevator at the young age of 57. He was reportedly found “collapsed” with no visible signs of trauma, and first responders were unable to revive him. There is speculation that he died from a drug overdose, but autopsy results won’t be ready for another few weeks.

Though Prince displayed a somewhat reserved, “introverted” persona, he was very much a #13 FCIR. Watch any interviews of him at length and you will quickly detect his precocious, analytical mind. As such, he possessed good insights into life. He even possessed some of the amazing attributes of Israel’s great King Solomon, who experienced nearly any and everything (including many drugs) and came to realize that one should set boundaries for themselves. “Too much freedom can lead to the soul’s decay,” he once stated. Prince, also known as Rogers Nelson, was also a devoted Jehovah Witness, and once said, “Most people don’t want to talk about politics and religion. They say, ‘Let’s talk about something else.'”

Prince’s reserved nature likely came from his abusive childhood. He told Larry King years ago that his father was a very strict disciplinarian who physically abused him and kicked him out on the street when he was still young. Prince’s former tour manager went on to share about his family life, His mother basically walked away from him, and his father struggled to raise him and threw in the towel. It certainly doesn’t add up to a very secure, well-rounded individual.

Sadly, once again, the mighty narcotic has likely claimed another life. Prince was an avid reader of scripture, paralleling much of the Bible, wherein we all can well be reminded, “You keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on You.”

Written by: Staff
(click for source)

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4/18 – The legacy of the retired Kobe Bryant

Well, Kobe Bryant has retired, and he certainly went out with a bang, scoring 60 points against the Utah Jazz on Wednesday. The day has been dubbed “Mamba Day” in recognition of his nickname, and many stars have come out to give their respects. There’s Alex Rodriguez (#5 FEIR) who tweeted, “To my good friend. Thanks for all of the memories and inspiration.”  Then there’s #1 FEAR David Ortiz, who wrote, “congrats on ur amazing career!! hmu next year when we both hav 2 much free time LOL!” The NBA’s Tony Parker (#10 BCAR) chimed in, stating, “Heroes come and go, but legends are forever.”  Another #10 BCAR to pay his respects was Tiger Woods, who tweeted, “As a diehard Lakers fan, thank you @kobebryant for all the memories and of course the 5 titles!” In fact, just about every well-known athelete you can think of came out to say something positive about Bryant.

Did you catch Kobe’s farewell speech from center court after the game? It was fun to watch, particularly in light of Brain Type. He assured the crowd how much he loved them over and over again, and he had one refreshingly candid moment when he looked around and said, “You know, what’s funny, the thing that had me cracking up all night long was the fact that I go through 20 years of everybody screaming, ‘Pass the ball!’ and then last night they’re like, ‘Don’t pass it!'” Kobe’s laugh afterwards is hilarious, in a rare moment where he chuckles like a little kid. You can see the video below. Also, isn’t it interesting that even though he was forever reluctant to give the ball up (unless triple teamed!), he heard the cries of fans, and teammates, to share the leathered sphere?

In other news, guess who was one of Kobe’s biggest inspirations before entering the league? You’d be hard-pressed to guess correctly. It came as a random phone call as Kobe was balancing a barbell on his shoulders in the gym, and he almost didn’t pick up. “Hi, it’s Michael,” the voice on the line said. “Michael who?” Kobe asked. “Michael Jackson.” Bryant at first didn’t believe it, but then he recognized the voice, though it sounded lower and subdued. “He’s calling me out of the %$&% blue,” Bryant recalled. “I don’t think it’s a real phone call.”  The quiet King of Pop then went on to invite him out to his Neverland Ranch. Kobe accepted, and once there Jackson took him to his private theater and introduced the young athlete to Grace Kelly (#11 FCAL), Fred Astaire (#13 FCIR), and Ginger Rogers (#13), as Michael explained they were the inspiration behind his dancing and music. Jackson went on to “describe the lineage of his music, breaking down songs note by note, taking Bryant through the process of recording ‘Billie Jean.'”

I thought I was working hard until I met him, admitted Kobe.

Interestingly, both MJ’s and KB’s Brain Types are not naturally driven in the outer world. The #10 and the #2 designs prefer to conserve their energy, being much more apt to put play before work (Right vs. Left brain). So, what happened? Some of you may have already guessed it. Both Jackson and Bryant shared disciplinarian fathers, and the power of nurture didn’t alter their inborn natures, but it did their stereotypical BT behaviors. Think also of #10 Tiger Woods, whose #13 FCIR dad (Earl) drove him like a drill sergeant. (And why not since he was a former Green Beret!) As dominant Q2 (internal) decision-makers, Michael and Kobe became (external) perfectionists in their respective trades. “You’ve got to study all the greats,” Jackson told Kobe. “You’ve got to learn what made them successful and what made them unsuccessful.”  The #2 and #10 can be some of the best mimics (and are also often driven by lingering insecurities). You couldn’t teach a person what I’ve learned just standing and watching, Michael once said. As for Kobe? He spent nearly his entire life mimicking another great MJ … Michael Jordan (#6 BEIR). This MJ also resided in ever-ruminating Q2, and he too was overseen by a tough-minded father (a #6 like Michael!)

Now that all has been said and done, few compare Bryant to the greatness of Jordan, which we predicted from day one. Nonetheless, Kobe will be remembered as a great player, although, like he said, maybe he could have passed the ball just a little bit more.

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Written by: Staff
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4/13 – Comparing coach Kurt Rambis to coach Derek Fisher

When you compare the #13 FCIR to the #8 BEIL, you see quite the contrast. One Brain Type views the bigger picture, while the other the fine details. One is keen on flexibility, adaptability, and taking in new ideas, while the other appreciates structure, organization, and sticking with what is tried and true. Derek Fisher, a #13 FCIR, who is now ex-coach of the New York Knicks, recently suggested that the that the triangle offense was difficult to teach and implement for his team.

Of course, the man who made the offense famous was Phil Jackson, a #16 BCILanother design quite different than the #13. Now currently acting as interim coach for the Knicks is former Laker Kurt Rambis. Does anyone know Kurt’s Brain Type? It is a rare one not commonly found in the NBA, past or present. Yes, he is a #8 BEIL, and he strongly disagrees with Fisher’s assessment of the triangle offense, suggesting that Derek just didn’t dedicate enough time to teaching it. In his own words, If you want to learn something, and truly learn something, you have to immerse yourself in it. That probably goes for about anything. We didn’t fully immerse ourselves into practicing [the triangle], developing it, learning how to work with it, going through the breakdown drills to execute it properly so we kind of skirted over things.”

Ouch! Although the statement itself was not vindictive, it cast quite the shadow on Mr. Fisher. One journalist accurately pointed out, “The response highlights what seems to be a fundamental difference between Rambis and Fisher: their commitment to running the triangle offense. Rambis is fully committed to running it. Fisher vacillated between running sets with a one-guard front and running an offense with a two-guard front, which is the traditional triangle alignment.”

A #13 FCIR vacillating? You don’t say!

Rambis went on to state, “We’re constantly wavering, going back and forth. So to an extent, our players almost treat it like plays now rather than a real sequence of actions and a real system that you work under.”

Wow. If one article could accurately display the difference between the Empiracal, Left brain (Rambis), verses the Conceptual, Right brain (Fisher), this is it, folks!

As for difficulty? Rambis again says, “First off it’s not difficult. It’s like learning anything new.”  Rambis thinks the team just needs more time. “Phil Jackson and Tex Winter have always felt it takes players, regardless of who they are, a good year when you’re staying in it, when you’re executing it the way it’s supposed to be executed.”

Yes, once again, the world just makes more sense when you posses the knowledge of Brain Types.

Written by: Staff
(click for article)

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4/11 – Historic loss for Jordan Spieth at the Masters

The Masters was tough to watch yesterday for leader Jordan Spieth (#13 FCIR). He was set to win his second consecutive green jacket and join the likes of Jack Nicklaus (#8 BEIL), Nick Faldo (#7 FEIL), and Tiger Woods (#10 BCAR) to do so. Instead, the wheels came off on the 12th hole, and he lost his lead after a quadruple-bogey 7 on the par-3. Spieth’s first shot landed in the water, and taking a drop from 70 yards out (instead of choosing to chip from below the green), his next shot landed in the water again. Taking another drop, Jordan’s shot landed in the bunker behind the green, where after he was able to get out and in for his 7. It was surreal, and paved the way for Englishman Danny Willett (#13 FCIR) to win the tournament instead.

It was really a very tough 30 minutes for me that hopefully I never experience again, said Spieth. “I didn’t take that extra deep breath and really focus on my line on 12. Instead, I went up and I just put a quick swing on it. The dominant Conceptual Spieth then added, Big picture, this one will hurt. It will take a while.

Every Brain Type chokes, for sure, yet some more than others. For the #13 FCIR, under the biggest pressure, their pliable motor-skills have the potential to break down. Also, with more typical neural activity, they can too often over-synthesize and over-strategize the game of golf. There’s no doubt Spieth’s brain was firing on all cylinders as he considered his 5 shot lead, and after his first shot went into the water on the 12th, his brain caught fire. It is at this crucial time that #13s need to be reminded to relax and keep a smooth tempo, as they tend to swing too fast. As Jordan himself said, he didn’t pause to take that “extra breath”, but put a “quick swing on it”. (Don’t forget, when each BT succumbs to pressure, it essentially localizes in its dominant region and cerebral function. For the #13 BT, this is Q1 and spatial abstraction not conducive to an in-the-moment, focused, and easy golf swing.)

And round and round the #13 FCIR winning-wheel goes, as a #13 loses at the last moment and another #13 takes the championship. Willet the Brit, however, was able to stay calm and collected with little pressure. He began the day 4 shots behind Jordan and had nothing but warm vibes as he cherished his final round amongst the azaleas and warm southern breezes.

Yes, we were hopeful to see some consistency develop in the likes of Mr. Spieth, but like so many other FCIRs who have come and gone before him, it wasn’t meant to be this time.

Written by: Staff
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4/4 – Kemba Walker makes good adjustment to his shot

The NBA’s Kemba Walker has made a slight adjustment to his jump shot, and it’s doing wonders for his game. The point guard for the Charlotte Hornets moved the ball just a few inches to his right, away from his face, thereby allowing him to see the basket with both eyes. He also is tucking the elbow in before the release, forming a ‘V’ that shooting coaches often stress. It was tough especially early on when I wasn’t making shots during the summer, Walker said. I said, I can’t do it. I’m going back to my old shot. I was having doubts.

His shooting coach, however, told him to stick with it, and he did. Now, Walker is shooting career-highs from the field (42.9%) and three-pointers (37.1%, up from 30.4% last season) and averaging career-highs in points (21). Now that Kemba can shoot, it makes him a better pick-and-roll player, as his defenders can no longer sag under the pick. Speaking about Walker, assistant coach Steve Hetzel said, He has a natural flow to the way he plays and puts a lot of pressure on his defender. They’re always on edge not knowing what moves he’s going to make. He has the ability to make them pay for what they decide.”

Kemba is a quick, explosive, talented #5 FEIR, a Brain Type not commonly found in the NBA these days. Former #5 greats have been Wilt Chamberlain, Elgin Baylor, Karl Malone, A.C. Green, Steve Nash, and Danny Ainge. They play with high-energy, and if not careful can have the tendency to play a bit out of control. Remember John Starks? He was another explosive #5 FEIR who put “a lot of pressure on his defender.”

Walker is a major reason why the Hornets are 41-30 this year, and although he didn’t make the All-Star roster this season, folks are speculating we may very well see him there next time.

Written by: Staff
(click for source)

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4/1 – Lebron James wants his fellow ‘Doves’

Lebron James had an ironic choice of favorite players to play with one day. As BTInsiders know, James is a #1 FEAR, and guess who he would like on his team? I really hope that, before our career is over, we can all play together. At least one, maybe one or two seasons me, Melo, D-Wade, CP we can get a year in. I would actually take a pay cut to do that.

Lebron is speaking of Carmelo Anthony, a #1 FEAR, Dwayne Wade, a #2 BEAR, and Chris Paul, another #1 FEAR. The phrase “birds of a feather stick together” certainly rings true in this case, or more like “Doves of a feather stick together.”  Those still learning BTs may be asking, Doves?” Yes, remember, the EA designs are classified as ‘Doves’, whereas EIs are classified as ‘Hawks’, CIs as ‘Owls’, and CAs as ‘Storks’.

Doves are known as ‘Personal Observers’, and are friendly, down-to-earth, and very much in the here-and-now. The abstract world is not to their liking. They are ALL gross-motor dominant, relying primarily on the big muscles of the body. Looking at the dove, we observe this as it walks on the ground. James, Anthony, Wade, and Paul are each unique individuals, yet they all share this one genetic commonality between them.

If they ever get together some day, you can be sure there will be lots of warm-fuzzies going around, provided their inflated egos don’t first get in the way.

Written by: Staff
(click for source)

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3/29 – Darko Milicic shares candid #5 insight

The #5 FEIR is typically very candid, speaking his or her mind and not worrying too much about what people think of them. The flip side is … they often care about how they look. The “Opportunist” can be big on appearance, wanting people to notice them. Think of Sylvester Stalone and Arnold Schwarzenegger in acting, Payne Stewart and Greg Norman in golf, or Alex Rodriguez and Reggie Jackson in baseball. They are also gifted realists, seeing the world through their Inanimate, Empirical lens.

Darko Milicic is a #5 former NBA player who has been one to speak his mind, and recently shared good insight about his career and his attitude in life. It’s just simple, my career was how it was and I don’t miss that. I went to the NBA as a kid, barely 18, didn’t have the attitude I should have had. Darko was born in Serbia, and when the opportunity came to make money, he jumped at the chance. I thought as a kid that talent was God-given, but it’s not. God gives you talent and you should use that talent with the real meaning of that word. I was stubborn. Maybe being young had something to do with it. There was option then of going to the NBA or staying in Serbia because Hemofarm knew that if I went to NBA they would get more money than they would get if I went to some European club. Here you had poverty and money was there.

Milicic also had a few interesting things to share about some NBA players. On Kobe Bryant (#2 BEAR):  “Nobody in particular annoyed me, but Kobe Bryant is the dirtiest player with the things he does on the court.”  On Dikembe Mutombo (#14 BCIR):  “I finally get a chance to play and (Mutombo) starts taunting me and daring me to fight. Why would I need that? I didn’t understand half of what he said. I mean, he’s been there 20 years and still doesn’t know the language well enough.”

lol, one aspect we forgot to mention is that #5s can also be pretty funny. On another note, one comment Darko had to say about American basketball itself was, “I can’t play with American players. They only talked about who dunked on whom, who crossed over whom. I was weird to them because I didn’t think that way.

Be sure to click the “source” link below for this article to see a few #5 glamor shots of Darko.Not bad for a 7-footer.

Written by: Staff
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